Productivity

Note taking tips: Capture & Create

October 31, 2020
  •  
2 mins read
Ben Willmott
Founder

What is Capture & Create?

One of my favourite note-taking methods I like to use alongside Mind Maps is a technique I first heard about from Jim Kwik who is a memory expert from the states. It’s called the capture and create method. 

This approach is an excellent note-taking strategy for meetings when you want a clear separation between what you hear in the meeting, versus what you have learnt or what you need to do after the meeting. 

Before I explain the approach, it is essential that if you use this note-taking approach, you should take notes by writing it down versus typing it.

This is because studies with handwritten notes, you retain more of the information. It also helps you to write down what you want to recall, as often writing something down is slower than typing.

Writing by hand, strengthens the learning process. When typing on a keyboard, this process may be impaired.


If you love your iPad for capturing everything you could use a stylus or take a picture of the notes after the meeting. 

How to do this Note Taking Method?

This note taking tip is quick and easy to do. Don’t worry about how it looks, it’s about the content.
  1. Split the page down the middle with a single line
  2. On the left title, it’s something like Capture, Notes. Anything that makes sense to you that means this is what is being said in the meeting
  3. On the right-hand-side title it Thoughts and Action, or Create or Learnings. This is where you’ll put your questions, actions, ideas etc.
  4. Like a Mind Map you should keep the notes high level. This is so you have just enough information to understand the note taken and not trying to add to much detail.
  5. Before you add any notes, try to identify what’s important, so prioritise the information. Otherwise, you’ll end up with far too much information, and you won’t know what to do with it all
  6. Once the meeting has finished, make sure you review the notes to reiterate in your brain what you’ve captured. This helps cement the learnings to memory.
  7. Add any additional info to make them clearer or anything extra you missed before
  8. Highlight anything you really want to remember or do immediately.

Ben Willmott
Founder
Ben is Head of Agile Practices at the London based creative agency Karmarama where he creates bespoke ways or working for his clients and teams. Ben is also the founder of The PPM Academy specializing in coaching Project Management, Agile Delivery and how to be more productive at home and work.

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